Analog-The Shift

It’s painful to find my favorite CDs tossed into the $3.99 bin. How did this happen? I’m in my sixties now, and my analog list grows as more and more of my favorites slide off the list of things that qualified me as “hip” back in the day to the list of things I have to define or describe, often unsuccessfully, to the trending generation.

Yes, I love a book with crisp pages that can be turned rather than tapped. And in a restaurant I like to place my order with a waitress rather than keying it in to a machine at my table. Plastic ice trays are a must have in my freezer that opens with a door at the top of my refrigerator rather than a drawer at the bottom. In the mornings I hand wash my dishes after drinking plain, black coffee. Not latte or mocha caramel something or other. I do, however, send and receive texts….often. But no form of communication beats a face-to-face conversation. I’d rather sit and have a talk with you over a glass of iced tea than Skype or text or email or post on your timeline or tweet or even talk with you by phone. 

Analog, for me, is about simple. The older I get the more I like the simple things in life. And the faster my items once classified as trendy make the big shift to analog. I remember transitioning from vinyl records to eight tracks to cassettes to CDs. Now, even CDs have found their place on my analog list. When did CDs become extinct? And what, exactly, is MP3?